Vicki Nunn

by Vicki Nunn

Introduction

As mentioned in our other articles in “Let’s Talk About Sex,” we are sexual beings because that’s the way God made us. Sex within marriage is something to be celebrated by the couple because it creates an intimacy and a private connection which bonds the two together. The sexual urge is an inherent part of our nature, but was never meant to be abused through masturbation, sexual promiscuity, or intimacy outside of marriage or through the use of pornography.

Sexual temptation is one of the most common struggles for Christians, particularly for singles and it’s one of those issues that few people, if anyone wants to talk about. Many singles and even married people often feel that it’s only a problem for them or for a few sinful Christians, and so they hang our heads in shame and try to struggle on alone.

I believe that most adults in the world today have at least once in their lives given into masturbation, and anyone who tells you otherwise is likely lying. The teenage years are probably one of the most difficult for Christians to get through without giving into sexual temptation, particularly for boys whose bodies are more easily and obviously stimulated. It would be a rare individual who could avoid giving into masturbating.

You are not alone in your struggles. This is so important that I need to repeat it to you:

you are NOT alone in your struggles.

At the bottom of this article are some online links to find out more about its dangers and a link where you may to go if you are struggling with pornography,

Pornography Kills

“Pornography Kills” may seem a rather strong title for this topic, but it’s very true. It can kill different areas of, and relationships in our lives. Following are some examples:

  • pornography kills love;

  • pornography kills intimacy;

  • pornography kills passion;

  • pornography kills our interactions;

  • pornography kills marriage;

  • pornography kills the natural development of our sexual nature;

  • pornography kills our normal response to the sexual urge;

  • pornography can kill the natural development of one or more of our upcoming generations;

and so on. Read on to find out more.

Pornography is Addictive, Just Like a Drug

When our brains find an experience that we enjoy, it activates neurons which release chemicals that strengthen different connections in our brain. The more often we have that experience, the stronger the connection becomes.

With pornography, our brain reacts to it by making a connection with pleasure, and the more we watch it, the stronger those connections become. Unfortunately it becomes addictive because it takes more and more porn to stimulate that pleasure and to keep those connections strong. As with many addictions, it begins to consume more and more of our thoughts and our lives until it becomes such a need within our brains, that we cannot switch it off.

Thankfully, the addiction can be overcome. Research indicates that those strong connections in our brains will become weaker and weaker, the more we resist the temptation. The need for porn will eventually weaken, and down the track those connections will fade away.

How much better for each of us though, if that addiction had never begun.

While most of us would think that pornography is only a problem for men, there are also many women of varying ages, who have become addicted. Consider also that there are many Christian men and women who have an addiction to pornography, but that topic is rarely, if ever acknowledged, let alone discussed.

Neuron in the brain

Pornography has Become a Public Health Crisis

In January 2017, South Dakota senators (USA) unanimously passed a resolution that stated pornography had become a public health crisis. This was based on a report by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation. With more than twenty major studies being undertaken since 2009, the irrefutable conclusion is that pornography damages the body and the brain, and has lead to an increase in sexual violence in our community.

Pornography impacts the way that we view sex and particularly the way we view women. It consistently tells its viewers that women want to be raped or physically abused when it comes to sex, and even encourages the lie that rapists are unable to control their urge to rape. It also encourages males to believe that when a woman says no to sex, they actually mean yes, or if they wear a short skirt or skimpy clothing, they’re just ‘asking for it.’

Sexual Objectification Linked to Violence Towards Females

According to research undertaken by psychologists at the University of Kent in the UK, there is a direct link between aggression towards females and the sexual objectification of girls. They discovered that the more males objectify females, the more they acted aggressively towards them, and viewed them only as sexual objects, ie as bodies for sexual use by males. The study also made a connection between violent video games, and sexualised media poses, with aggression towards girls.

While not every person who views porn will show this aggression, it’s clear that porn isn’t harmless and that for many it affects how they view sexuality, the human body and girls.

Consider also that another study showed that convicted rapists use the same language as men’s magazines to describe females. The University of Surrey’s Dr Peter Hegarty said:

“There is a fundamental concern that the content of such magazines normalises the treatment of women as sexual objects. We are not killjoys or prudes who think that there should be no sexual information and media for young people. But are teenage boys and young men best prepared for fulfilling love and sex when they normalise views about women that are disturbingly close to those mirrored in the language of sexual offenders?”

Is Pornography Violent?

An earlier study of popular porn videos discovered that in 304 scenes, there were around 267 acts of physical violence (88%), 149 instances of verbal aggression (49%), with 289 instances where the victim responded with either pleasure or neutrally. Disturbingly, 286 of the victims shown were females (94%).

The overriding message that arises from pornography is that women like to be raped, forced into sex, and also being beaten up. It’s not surprising that another study indicated that the more a person was exposed to violent porn, the more likely they were to rape. Even viewing non-violent porn can lead to increased coercion to have sex or to use alcohol and drugs to persuade women to have sex.

Does Porn Lead to Domestic Violence?

Not every instance of domestic violence arises out of the use of pornography, but pornography has led to an increase in domestic violence, according to welfare workers at the Gold Coast Centre Against Sexual Violence.

At a meeting in late 2016, information was shared about the increasing levels of violence against women who were forced into sex, and then physically abused, with many victims seeking treatment at emergency rooms at local hospitals.

Centre director Di McLeod said:

“What used to be an uncommon story is now very much an everyday story involving women of varied ages and diverse backgrounds.”

In the past five years there was a 56% increase in referrals from public hospital emergency departments.

The welfare workers claim that some who view pornography don’t understand that there is a difference between reality and fantasy, and they believe that women are “up for it
24-7.”

Fearful woman with black eye

Conclusion

With children as young as eleven viewing pornography on a regular basis, including pornographic rape and sexual violence, this is a horrifying situation that needs to be addressed. As individuals and particularly as a community, we need to do more to stop the damage being done.

New generations of children are growing into damaged teenagers and adults who cannot function well in relationships, and no longer know how to think and act appropriately towards others, particularly women.

While the porn industry continues to find a willing audience to whom it can sell its ‘products,’ it will never stop. All it takes is one individual in one community to stand up and make a difference – to help their local community understand the dangers of porn, and encourage others to personally become involved. If communities across Australia and across the world would take a stand, perhaps we’ll be able to save our society from self-destructing in the long-term.

[End]

Note: You may also like to read an article by a Christian on the topic, from a personal perspective. Tim Everton’s article about his own addiction to pornography titled “My Year Without Porn” can be found on this link.

Bibliography:
Author: Steve Weatherbe, dated 17 October 2017, Catch the Fire Ministries: “Mayor rallies citizens to ‘create a city free from porn’,” source: www.catchthefire.com.au/2017/01/mayor-rallies-citizens-to-create-a-city-free-from-porn/, accessed 07/02/17
Author: Steve Weatherbe, dated 17 October 2017, Lifesite: “Mayor rallies citizens to ‘create a city free from porn’,” source: www.lifesitenews.com/news/a-city-free-from-porn-campaign-is-born-in-australia, accessed 07/02/17
Author: no name, 9 October 2016, Fight the New Drug: “Unlocking The Brain’s Delete Button: How To Start Erasing Years Of Watching Porn,” source: www.fightthenewdrug.org/the-brains-delete-button-erase-years-watching-porn/, accessed 07/02/17
Author: Haley Halverson, dated 26 January 2017, End Sexual Exploitation: “South Dakota’s Senate Just Declared Pornography a Public Health Crisis,” source: www.endsexualexploitation.org/articles/south-dakotas-senate-just-declared-pornography-public-health-crisis/, accessed 07/02/17
Author: no name, dated 26 January 2017, Fight the New Drug: “Psychologists Find Sexual Objectification Linked To Physical Aggression Toward Females,” source: www.fightthenewdrug. org/psychologists-find-sexual-objectification-of-women-linked-to-physical-aggression-toward-females/, accessed 07/02/17.
Author: no name, dated 30 December 2016, Fight the New Drug: “Study Finds Men’s Magazines And Convicted Rapists Use The Same Language To Describe Women,” source: www.fightthenewdrug.org/convicted-rapists-porn-magazines-common-youd-think/, accessed 07/02/ 17.
Author: no name, dated 11 October 2016, Fight the New Drug: “Data Shows Australian Domestic Violence Crisis Is Being Fueled By Pornography,” source: www.fightthenewdrug.org/data-shows-australian-domestic-violence-crisis-is-being-fueled-by-pornography/, accessed 07/02/17.